Bailey’s Tap Room – Keep a Stiff “Upper Lip”

Bailey's - Repeats on the Top 100 Beer Bars

Bailey’s – Repeats on the Top 100 Beer Bars

As was the case with The Tugboat Brewery, (reviewed in March, 2013), Thebeerchaser was embarrassed that he worked downtown – right on the Portland Transit Mall for many years and had never visited – or even known about Bailey’s Tap Room.  For five straight years, it has made Draft Magazine’s Top 100 USA Beer Bars.  It even got special recognition in the preface to the list with the following quote:

“We want you to go to Bailey’s Taproom in Portland, Ore., which cares so much about beer freshness, the digital menu says when each keg was tapped and how much is left. We want you to go to all 100 of these places, because they really are a cut above the rest.” (Actually, part of this statement is incorrect – the digital display shows how much of the keg is left, but does not give the date it was tapped, although it does have the designation, “Just Tapped” for a few selections. )

Charlie and Jack Faust with Thebeerchaser logo

Charlie and Jack Faust with Thebeerchaser logo

Accompanying me were Oregon appellate lawyer, Jack Faust, – who before retiring, made it on a number of list for many years – that of Oregon’s and America’s best lawyers.  Jack, who was also the award-winning moderator of KATU’s Town Hall program, was joined by his son, Charlie.

Bailey’s has also made Willamette Week’s Annual Bar Guide, featuring the paper’s favorite Portland bars every year since its opening in 2007, but let’s examine the rationale for Bailey’s –  BEER!!! (not that there’s anything wrong with that….)

Scott - one of the knowledgeable and helpful bartenders

Scott – one of the knowledgeable and helpful bartenders

"Beer-me-up, Scotty!"  The space-age display

“Beer-me-up, Scotty!” The space-age display

The twenty-four rotating taps of West-coast beers – according to Scott, the friendly and knowledgeable bartender – they tap about five new ones each day – are an eclectic and impressive list supplemented by spotless showcases featuring over fifty bottled beers from all over the USA.

An impressive selection of bottled beers too!

An impressive selection of bottled beers too!

But the title of 100 Best Beer Bars begs the question, “How come?”   The Beerchaser Tour of Portland Bars, Taverns and Pubs is not primarily about the beer.  It’s about the ambiance and distinguishing characteristics that make you want to return to an establishment with your friend(s).

And that’s lacking at Bailey’s as evidenced by the following excerpts from the Willamette Week guide:

2009“What it lacks in atmosphere (white walls, bright lights and sparse decorations give off the vibe of an operating room) Bailey’s makes up in suds.”

2012“Simplicity is the name of the game at this busy downtown beer bar.  No liquor, no wine, no food, no games – just 20 taps of craft beers and a dozen tables filled with mostly male computer programmers, loan officers and other assorted cubicle drones.”

2014 –  “Really, the people are the only problem at Baileys.  First, there are always far too many of them crammed into the SW Broadway space, bird-dogging tables even when somebody just gets up to go the restroom.”

P1020110
Now it’s certainly true, that we had an excellent sampling of esoteric beers – and it helps that  they have both large and small glasses (4 ounces) for a number of brews, so you can get a good sampling and maintain your equilibrium and your wallet.

And Scott and Janelle, the bartenders, were extremely helpful and patient in explaining each one – but the overall atmosphere was more like that of a cafeteria (without the food…) than a bar or pub.

Between the four ounce glasses and sharing some pints, we tasted the following beers:

Green Flash White IPA (Belgian)         Oakshire Overcast Espresso Stout

Ninkasi Critical Hit      Kermit the Hop IPA        Stillwater French Farm Ale

Heater Allen Pilsner (McMinnville)      Ballast Point Navigator Doppelbock

New Belgian Gruitt (horehound, bog myrtlle, yarrow, wormwood and elderflower)

All of them were great except the Espresso Stout, which would have been better at Starbucks.

No food except what comes in externally - thanks Charlie!

No food except what comes in externally – thanks Charlie!

Fortunately, Charlie Faust had the foresight to bring some pretzels we could munch on and a number of reviews talk favorably about Santeria, the Mexican restaurant across the street that will deliver orders to go to the bar, and evidently has great food.

The lack of atmosphere and food means you focus the conversation on the beer and your compatriots – that’s not a bad thing given the background of the Fausts:

For example, I learned that Charlie, after graduation from U of O, traveled for a year in Europe and SE Asia, then worked as a staffer for Senator Bob Packwood.  That prepared him to weather the storms when he worked for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and had the experience of being on the crew in a NOAA hurricane research plane during Gloria in 1985 – peak winds of 155 mph.

Charlie's plane was in there someplace....
Charlie’s plane was in there someplace….

 

Jack Faust - Brews his own beer besides doing some other stuff....
Jack Faust – Brews his own beer besides doing some other stuff….

And drinking beer with Jack Faust, means chatting with a very interesting and intelligent guy – after all, for years he had a hobby of brewing beer in his garage.  (once brewed a raspberry ale that was the color of sweat…)

He graduated first in his class at U of O Law School, was editor of the Law Review and still stimulates conversation with queries such as, “When will all the rhetorical questions end…?”

I shifted the conversation to past cases before the Oregon Court of Appeals and Supreme Court after he told me that he would have to kill me if I asked any more questions about his service as a Special Agent in the Far East Command of the Army Counterintelligence Corps during the Korean War.

I will have to admit, however, that Charlie and I were both fascinated by his recounting the details of his arguments in the 1986 Oregon Supreme case Oregon Republican Party v. State of Oregon.  Did the Party violate the Oregon Corrupt Practices Act provision that “[n]o person * * * shall directly or indirectly subject any person to undue influence?”

And  finally,Thebeerchaser’s standard practice of visiting each bar reviewed twice, paid off because Scott the bartender, casually mentioned that I should visit “Bailey’s Upper Lip.”  My response was to ask whether I needed a secret code word or a note from the bartender, but that wasn’t the case.

The entrance to the Upper Lip on Ankeny Street

The entrance to the Upper Lip on Ankeny Street

And walking part way down Ankeny Street to an inauspicious doorway with only a bottle on the door, and then up a dark, narrow stairway heightened the anticipation of what awaited.

Willamette Week’s 2014 Bar Guide sums it up well:  “There, you’ll find six well-chosen taps and a massive case of bottles ranging from Belgians to small-batch bourbon stouts.   P1020166

There’s a short bar, a long table for groups, a digital tap list, a bartender, a few high-top tables set on barrels…..”

There were less than ten people, while the Taproom below was very crowded and Luke, the bartender, told me that the group was typical – evidently a lot of people are just not aware of the speakeasy-type addition to the main floor bar.   I decided to be bold and had a small glass of Nebraska Brewing’s Sexy Betty Imperial Stout.  (Betty was, in fact, hot….)

Bartender Luke and the bar at The Upper Lip

Bartender Luke and the bar at The Upper Lip

If you want a to sample a wide variety of draft or bottled beers from all over the world and receive expert guidance and advice from the staff, Bailey’s is your place. 

Bottled beers from all over -- to say the least

Bottled beers from all over — to say the least

If you want the ambiance of a neighborhood bar with good food and interesting regulars, Thebeerchaser suggests going Off Broadway…..    

Long tables upstairs

Long tables upstairs

 

 

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If you want to view all a map with all the establishments previously reviewed by Thebeerchaser, click the link which states, “View Larger Map” below.

Bailey’s Tap Room and The Upper Lip                  231 SW Broadway

 

 

 

 

 

Road Trip — To the Skyline Tavern

The Historic Skyline Tavern

The Historic Skyline Tavern

There are many bars – most notably in what is known as Portland’s Barmuda Triangle in Southeast Portland, where the setting for many bars is a busy urban intersection on Powell or Belmont, or one walks out into a strip-mall along a the busy street.  The attraction is thus, the interior design, the selection of beers and the character/clientele of the bar – not the setting.

The Skyline Tavern is the antithesis – an historic building that looks like a road-house in the woods on Skyline Drive near Forest Park – 9.7 miles from downtown Portland.  There are only four beers on tap – and the Terminal Gravity IPA was gone on that August evening we visited.  They do, however, have a bunch of bottled and canned beers, but no cocktails or hard liquor, and the only food is essentially microwave faire.  And by the way, bring cash or you may end up washing dishes – no credit or debit cards at this venue.

TrinketsThe saloon does have a few interesting antique trinkets and signs.

Oh Schlitz, where have thy gone when we need you now......

Oh Schlitz, where have thy gone when we need you now……

Unless your commute takes you by the pub, however, it would be best to save your visit for a cloudless day when you can take advantage of the expansive patio, the wonderful view of the Willamette Valley and the fire-pits where you can grill your own food and eat at one of the picnic tables in the beer garden or play Ping-Pong on the porch.  They also have a good juke box.

Of course, some readers would point out that waiting for a cloudless day in Oregon limits the opportunity to about 47 days per year.

Old - growth timber is improved over a brewski

Old – growth timber is improved over a brewski

I hit the Skyline with Beerchaser regular, Portland lawyer, Scott Whipple, the same afternoon we visited  another historic Portland bar – Slabtown last August.  Scott was still on an adrenaline high from our intense Pop-a-Shot competition in the back room at Slabtown, and immediately suggested we play pool – I might add that it was harder trying to hold a cue stick with buttered micro-wave popcorn on our hands, but Scott probably knew that.

Still riding an adrenaline high from Hop-a-shot at Slabtown
Still riding an adrenaline high from Pop-a-Shot at Slabtown
The chalk was only partially helpful in absorbing the popcorn butter
The chalk was only partially helpful in absorbing the popcorn butter

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We talked to friendly bartender, Diane, a Scappoose High School graduate, who has worked at The Skyline for seven years.

Diane and Thebeerchaser with the old logo

Diane and Thebeerchaser with the old logo

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This excerpt from an October 2012 review in Portland Monthly Magazine, describes the venue perfectly:

“The Skyline is like a summer camp for casual drinkers:  The metronome of ping-pong balls clacking on the back porch, the clang and thunk of horseshoes thrown in the pit, the smell of burgers sizzling on the BYO – meat community grill, all played out in front of a tree-lined view of the Willamette Valley that’ll put a lump in your throat……”                                                                   

"The metronome of Ping-Pong balls....."

“The metronome of Ping-Pong balls…..”

Diane said that their biggest seller is 16 ounce PBR Tall Boys and that if you come on a summer evening or weekend, you will probably encounter a bunch of cyclists or motorcyclists at the end or on a break on their road trips.

——————

Not much in the way of draft beer, but plenty of bottles and cans. Have a PBR tall-boy
Not much in the way of draft beer, but plenty of bottles and cans. Have a PBR tall-boy!

The Skyline was pretty laid back and we were the only ones there besides Diane and a “regular.”

Scott did spice up the evening on the return trip by pointing out a forested spot on the off Thompson Road that “used to be the site of some memorable Sunset High School keggers…

I might add that since our Beerchaser Trip to Slabtown and The Skyline, Scott has shed ten of a planned forty-five pounds on his New Year’s diet – “I am shooting to lose 45 pounds by the time I turn 45..”  – some of which can be attributed to the stress of coaching The Sting his sons’ basketball team.

Stay tuned for a more svelte and conditioned Whipple - both mentally and physically

Stay tuned for a more svelte and conditioned Whipple – both mentally and physically

Some might object to the “minimalist” approach of the bar. This October 2013, Yelp review excerpt from a woman, whose initial paragraph in the review expressed shock that when she exited the bar, there were two guys inspecting a rifle that was pointed right at her votes for the status quo:

“But let’s be real here , I’m not a mans man. I am a lady who loves a nice game of horse shoes, pool or darts. I am also a lady who loves porch chillin’.

Skyline has an amazing back patio. Every time I’m here I have this horrible thought ‘If they just cut down all these trees, they would have any amazing view.’ You can, however, peek between the trees to enjoy a breathtaking view.  

As others have mentioned this bar is Cash Only – talk about no frills. If you’re reading this Skyline, don’t you change a f…ing thing. You keep it real, and I like it.”

And perhaps on a cloudless day in June, Scott and Thebeerchaser will return and toast his successful diet….??!!!

The Skyline Tavern    8031 NW Skyline Blvd.

The Diamond Hotel – The Cutting Edge in Hospitality and the Final Chapter in Thebeerchaser Tour of Eastern Oregon

The Round Barn south of Burns

The Peter French Round Barn south of Burns

After lunch in Burns – a great town where one pundit asserted, “You could get a good meal, rent a movie and hire a contract killer,” we headed southeast on Highway 78 to Diamond, Oregon (population 5) and our final night at the historic Diamond Hotel.

Passing through the most desolate country on this stretch –  Burns south past the Malheur National Wildlife Preserve almost to the Steen’s Mountains and the Alvord Desert. We toured the Peter French Round Barn – on the National Historic Register and constructed around 1870 by the cattle rancher who used it to train horses.

More prevalent than cars on Highway
More prevalent than cars on Highway 78
The remarkable interior structure of The Round Barn.

The remarkable interior structure of The Round Barn.

About 50 miles south of Burns, we also stopped at the Diamond Crater Natural Area -  which reportedly “has the best and most diverse basaltic volcanic features in the United States.” We saw lava flows and tubes and cinder cones from the observation area.

A road through the lava beds or what Dave maintained was a description of Thebeerchaser's career.

A road through the lava beds and a sign that Dave maintained was a description of Thebeerchaser’s career.

The Diamond Hotel was in a beautiful grove of poplar trees and we believed the sign that said the population of Diamond was only five since the hotel was in essence the center of “the city” – on Main Street.

The Census Bureau had an easy time in this venue

The Census Bureau had an easy time in this venue

After playing cards and having a beer, we sat down for “Family Dinner” – eight people sitting around a large rectangular table for an outstanding rib dinner with all the accoutrements.  The three-hour feast lasted that long because of the fascinating conversations with our fellow diners.

Family Dinner at the Diamond Hotel

Family Dinner at the Diamond Hotel

Two of the diners were a married couple in their mid-eighties and riding in on their Harley – mid-way through a tour that took them into Montana, Idaho and Oregon.

Another was a high-tech exec from Portland – a German immigrant who rode in on his BMW bike on which he has toured most of the western US and Canada.  We were the only boring ones at the table……David Thompson, one of the friendly owners, briefed us on history and shared stories while we were eating.

Notice the Harley and the BMW bike

Notice the Harley and the BMW bike

For those who love our state and want to explore, the Diamond Hotel should be on your bucket list.  Built in 1998, it was completely restored in 1990.  Shirley and David Thompson, descendants of one of the first families in Diamond bought the hotel in 2001 and now operate it.   P1010787

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It was headquarters for the Cycle Oregon staff during their 2013 ride this summer, which had a one night stay near Diamond.  The rates at the hotel, including the dinner, are very reasonable and it is quaint and interesting.

"Recreation" before Family Dinner

“Recreation” before Family Dinner

And so ended our four-day road trip.  After breakfast, we headed north – this time on Highway 205 back through John Day, then north on 395 and to Steve’s home in Pendleton.  We photographed the Stampede Room in Long Creek, which will have to wait until our next trip to raise a mug.

The Stampede will have to wait until the next trip

The Stampede will have to wait until the next trip

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We saw amazing sights and reaffirmed the premise of Thebeerchaser’s Tour of Portland Taverns, Bars and Pubs“Each bar or watering hole has its own unique character, ambiance and clientele,” – only in the central and eastern part of our wonderful state.

Whether sampling the brews of Johnny Brose at the Bull Ridge Brewery and Pub in Baker, kidding Patty at the Central Pastime Tavern in Burns, hearing stories from Heather at the Horseshoe Tavern in Prineville or just photographing the Powder Club Tavern in North Powder – which incidentally, is Under New Management or The Elkhorn Saloon in Sumpter, our visits to the Central and Eastern Oregon bars was outstanding and we would recommend it.

Powder    - Under New Management!

Powder – Under New Management!

We told Eastern Oregon bar jokes like the one about the dog who limped into the bar and said to the bartender, “I’m looking for the guy who shot my paw…!”

or

The bartender who asks the horse who comes into his bar and orders a beer, “Hey, why the long face..?”

Besides the establishments mentioned above we also visited The Solstice Brewery in Prineville, The Long Branch Saloon, The HideoutTavern and 10 Depot Street Bar and Restaurant in LaGrande and The Mt. Emily Ale House in Baker City.  These are reviewed in the first three blog-posts of this road trip.

1,746 miles, four nights and ___ bars later....

1,346 miles, four nights and eight bars later….

Now back to Portland where the next Beerchaser post will review the fairly new and interesting neighborhood tavern – Church.

Burns, Oregon – A Hot Stop on Thebeerchaser’s Tour of Eastern Oregon

One of the sights along the highway in God's Country

One of the sights along the highway in God’s Country

Our third day on the Eastern Oregon tour started with a drive from Catherine Creek State Park through Baker City to John Day where we had lunch.  Although it was too early for a beer, we photographed Kilpatrick’s Tavern in Mt. Vernon and I talked briefly to the female co-owner, who with her brother, lawyer, Mike Kilpatrick, are the offspring of the legendary Oregon lawyer, Roy Kilpatrick, who served on the Oregon State Bar Board of Governors from 1965-8.     

Kilpatricks Tavern in Mt. Vernon

Kilpatricks Tavern in Mt. Vernon

The sign from his law office by the entrance to the bar shows his firm was established in 1854.  Among the partners was Grace K. Williams, the first woman elected to serve as a district attorney in Oregon, who died at 90 on June 22, 2007, in John Day.

Robert Dayton, my colleague at Schwabe Williamson & Wyatt for many years, also worked at Kilpatrick’s firm and described Grace as, “Honest, tough and did not cave into pressure.”  

A Legendary Eastern Oregon law firm
A Legendary Eastern Oregon law firm

Bob described Roy Kilpatrick as “An Eastern Oregon powerhouse along with Wendell “Pinky” Gronso from Burns….and Owen Panner of Bend.  Owen and Roy hit it big as plaintiff’s lawyers for the folks flooded out in the big Mitchell flood of 1956.”  (After a thunderstorm resulted in four inches of rain in about 50 minutes a sudden surge of water destroyed or heavily damaged 20 buildings in the Mitchell and several bridges.)

His obituary in The Blue Mountain Eagle stated: “His red bow tie (was) as colorful as his vocabulary….He was a fighter, without peer…one of the last of the colorful characters who set the tone in courtrooms in the eastern two-thirds of Oregon.”

The Dirty Shame Bar and Pizzaria

The Dirty Shame Tavern and Pizzeria in John Day

We decided to explore some other camping options before opting for Clyde Holliday State Park in Mt. Vernon, and drove south from John Day and on the Forest Service Roads off Highway 395 past Wickiup and Parrish Cabin Campgrounds to what we hoped was a great camping and fishing at Canyon Meadows Lake.  Wrong…!

The "remains" of Canyon Lake.

The “remains” of Canyon Meadows Lake.

We saw the impact of the drought and forest fires. The only water at Canyon Meadows was a small creek which passed through an impressively large meadow – once the bottom of the lake – which ended with a recently erected beaver dam.

This campground shows the impact of the Parish Creek fire in 20
This campground shows the impact of the Parish Creek fire in 20

So we headed back to Clyde Holliday Park for dinner and the night with an early start the next day to Burns and Diamond.  The highway was straight and well-maintained as Dave, feeling the power in his left foot, powered his Highlander up to pass two cars until he realized in the nick of time it was a cop chasing a speeder…..!

Almost waved to him as we passed....

Broderick Crawford would have been appalled…..

The fourth day we drove south on Highway 95 to Burns – home of former U of O and now St. Louis Rams quarterback, Kellen Clemens.

We explored and made a stop at Reid’s Country Store which had an impressive growler option for beer-hungry patrons.

Impressive selection of beers

Impressive selection of beers

Growler options

Growler options

The grocer directed us to the Central Pastime Tavern  (CPT) for lunch,  which allowed us to ignore Steve who was pushing for the Broadway Deli after seeing the sign below and arguing, “It would be good food and also make sure our car had a smooth ride to Diamond……..”   P1010761

The Central Pastime - "Best food in Burns...."

The Central Pastime – “Best food in Burns….”

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It was a great recommendation.  We talked to owner Glen Williams, a Wisconsin native, who was very cordial and a real character.  After a variety of occupations involving surveying and power, he bought the CPT seven years ago and said the original bar was in the old hotel in Burns.

Thebeerchaser logo with Thebeerchaser and Glen Williams

Thebeerchaser logo with Thebeerchaser and Glen Williams

However, the bartender, Patty, was the star of our visit.  She served us a great lunch (chicken gizzards, a rib-steak sandwich and a taco salad) and we each had one of the eight beers on tap.

Rib Steak, onion rings and Heinz 57 - it doesn't get any better....

Rib Steak, onion rings and Heinz 57 – it doesn’t get any better….

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We listened to some great country music – it reminded us of Bob Newhart’s memorable quote, “I don’t like country music, but I don’t mean to denigrate those who do….And for people who like country music, ‘denigrate’ means ‘put down.'”  Of course, this prompted us to remember some of our favorite county-western titles such as:

  • If The Phone Don’t Ring, You’ll Know It’s Me
  • I’m So Miserable Without You; It’s like Having You Here
  • I Put the Golden Band on the Right Left Hand This Time (This one is actually a wonderful real tune by the late and great, George Jones)
Great interior design enhances the atmosphere at the Central Pastime

Great interior design enhances the atmosphere at the Central Pastime

Since we talked about Kellen Clemens, Dave decided to ask one of the patrons, “Do you know Kellen Clemens?”  The guy was listening to country-western and replied, “No, but hum a few bars to see if I remember the melody.”

But the conversation with the  hard-working Patty, an attractive and personable lady in her late forties or early fifties, was the best part of this bar.  I had seen the cocktail menu which included some interesting libations including one entitled, “Liquid Marijuana.” I didn’t want to pay $9 and had already had a PBR, so Patty offered to fix a shot sampler and told us the ingredients: Captain Morgan’s Rum, Blue Curacao, Malibu Rum and a splash of Midori (green melon liqueur).  It tasted like a Long Island Ice Tea with coconut.

Liquid Marijuana - "Because it's green and makes you hungry..."

Liquid Marijuana – “Because it’s green and makes you hungry…”

We could have talked to Patty all afternoon, but we needed to head to Diamond and our conversation concluded with this friendly exchange:

BeerchaserHow long have you worked at the Central Pastime, Patty?

Patty:  Eighteen years.

BeerchaserThen this must have been your first job out of high school?

Patty:  And I thought the cowboys around here were smooth talkers.  You city slickers put them to shame!

Good food and selection on "The Daily Specials"

Good food and selection on “The Daily Specials”

And with that parting dialogue, we took off south for the historic Diamond Hotel – our last night on Thebeerchaser Tour of Eastern Oregon.

The bar at the Central Pastime. Patty was camera shy but impressed with the city slickers passing through.

The bar at the Central Pastime. Patty was camera shy but impressed with the city slickers passing through.

Thebeerchaser Does Eastern Oregon – Part 1

Granite - one of the stops in the Eastern Oregon Beerchaser Tour

Granite – one of the stops in the Eastern Oregon Beerchaser Tour

After visiting pubs in six European countries on a 21-day Rick Steves’ Best of Europe Tour this summer, a return to basics was in order.  What better description of “basics” could one devise than a four-day road trip through Eastern Oregon – visiting taverns, pubs and bars along the way. (This post is the first of three installments…)

Historic beauty along the highway

Historic beauty along the highway

Psyched to start our 1,300 mile journey
Psyched to start our 1,300 mile journey

Thus, three of us – Thebeerchaser, brother-in-law, Dave Booher and Pendleton teacher and coach, Steve Larson, completed a 1,346 mile four-day trip in August.

We camped three nights and stayed at the wonderful Diamond Hotel, in Diamond, Oregon on the fourthP1010785Diamond, with a population of five, is so small that the “Welcome To” and “Come Again” signs could be on the same telephone pole.  Anyone who has not experienced this historic inn, should make it a bucket-list item.

As one can see from the map, we circled through the “God’s Country.”

The Route - From Prinevill on the West to Baker on the East - Diamond in the South and ending at Pendleton (North)
The Route – From Prineville on the West to Baker on the East – Diamond in the South and ending at Pendleton (North) – 1,346 miles in 4 days.

This trip was a great opportunity to either visit or photograph some of the colorful and historic local watering holes that are institutions in cities such  as Prineville, LaGrande, Baker, Fossil, Burns, John Day, Mitchell and Sumpter.

Solstice - LaGrande's only brewery

Solstice – Prineville’s only brewery

Prineville

Solstice Brewery Solstice celebrated its second anniversary in July and with a play area for tots (which we did not try) is a family oriented venue.  Shelby, our waitress, was friendly and helpful as was the owner, Joe, who told us it was the only brewery in Prineville and that they have a five-barrel capacity.

Shelby and Dave

Shelby and Dave with Thebeerchaser Logo

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P1010656

The Bar at Solstice

They bought their five-barrel brew kettle from Terminal Gravity Brewery in Enterprise. Their beer was good and we tried the War Paint Red Ale, Show-me-the-Honey Wheat Ale and Walton Lake Lager, three of six Solstice’s own brews.  We also had a good Sunday lunch.

The Horseshoe - Established in ____

The Horseshoe – Established in ____

Horseshoe Tavern  - Just up the street from Solstice on Prineville’s Main Street we met native Pennsylvanian, Heather, the bartender, who did a great job filling us in on the history of the bar, which is over 70 years old – a fact substantiated by the picture of the original owner, Howard Bose, on opening day.

Horseshoe Founders in 1940

Horseshoe Founders in 1940

Heather told us that her most challenging customers were the off-duty state troopers, who made the trucker patrons look tame.

They have seven beers on tap and we enjoyed the Bombshell Blonde from Cascade Lakes Brewery in Redmond.  This review from “Urban Spoon” summed up the Horseshoe pretty well, “Good food, huge portions.$1 beer, friendly staff.  What more could you want?”

Heather at the Horseshoe
Heather at the Horseshoe

Heather convinced Thebeerchaser to have an “Angry Balls” cocktail which is Angry Orchard Hard Cider (5% alcohol) and a drop of Fireball.  It was very good although evoked no emotional or physical reaction implied by the name.

LaGrande

The Hideout Saloon – Our next stop was in “downtown”, LaGrande, where Cindy, the gregarious bartender who has worked at the Hideout for ten years, hailed from the Land of Sky Blue Waters as did the “Beer-of- the-Day” – a draft Hamm’s.

Thebeerchaser "hiding out..."

Thebeerchaser “hiding out…”

P1010695

Cindy briefing Dave on the Hideout

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Cindy didn’t know exactly when the bar started operating, but said without equivocation, “It’s older than anybody here.”

Old Testament  Vintage

Old Testament Vintage

We noted that a number of patrons – other than ourselves –  reminded us of some of the Old Testament characters so we knew the bar was old.

Because they had cheap PBR and Dave was in a nostalgic mood, he harkened back to his days in the Navy’s Submarine Service and used the phonetic alphabet and ordered a “Papa – Bravo – Romeo,” which Cindy understood.

The LongBranch Saloon - Just down the street, we discovered our final LaGrande bar – one that had no lack of character and ambiance.  Patsy, the bartender didn’t know how old the bar was, but said that her grandmother worked there at one time.P1010699

Barbed-wire sculpture added to the atmosphere

Barbed-wire sculpture added to the atmosphere

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One young guy came in and she asked for his ID which he didn’t have.  He left – came back and showed his ID – then just got a glass of water….!  The Long Branch also has a quant diner attached that looked like it was from the 1950’s.

Straight from the 1950's..
Straight from the 1950’s..

We then debated where we should camp that evening.  Steve advocated flexibility, but I told him, “Spontaneity on this trip takes a lot of planning…”

We stopped at the Dairy Queen in John Day to assess our options, while I had a chocolate malt, Dave a Dilly Bar and Steve a DQ Sundae.  We couldn’t figure out why Dave told the Drive-thru waitress to make sure that our orders were “To Go.”

Unity Lake at Sunset

Unity Lake at Sunset

We headed east  on Highway 26 and about half way between John Day and Sumpter, we ended up at one of Oregon’s wonderful State Parks – Unity Lake State Recreation Site

“Camping” may be a stretch to describe our accommodations because we stayed in a cabin with bunks, but as you can see from the photos, it was a perfect ending to a day of exploration. 

A toast to God's Country!

A toast to God’s Country!

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A Tribute

And this post should end with a short tribute to the man who instilled my appreciation of God’s Country when I was in my teens and he was a carpet salesman for Mohawk Carpets.

My Dad - F. Duane Williams –  on whom we lovingly bestowed the moniker, “FDW”, grew up on the East Coast and thanks to his courage and that of my mom (Frannie), we moved to Oregon from Ohio in 1960 after a three-month camping trip (a VW bus hauling a Nimrod pop-up-tent trailer) across the US.  We missed three + weeks of school in the fall because FDW wrote the superintendent of schools that we were getting an outstanding education on the road.

FDW in God's Country

FDW in God’s Country

We all fell in love with Oregon on the trip and FDW quit his job and moved to Portland while Frannie sold the house and then drove the four kids across the country to our new home in Oregon City.   From that point on, FDW was imbued with “The spirit of high adventure.” 

FDW and his VW

FDW and his VW

Although he did not make much in commissions from his Eastern Oregon territory, he loved the trips. From the geology to mingling with his dealers such as Doc Mosier of Mosier’s Home Furnishings in John Day – founded in 1955 and now operated by Doc’s son he relished the adventure.

I still have a personally autographed copy of famous Oregon cattleman, Herman Oliver’s autobiography, Gold and Cattle Country, with whom my dad had many visits in Grant County.

And no trip was complete without  navigating a little-used Forest Service road in his VW Bus. (We once spent the night sleeping in the VW when we took the wrong turn got stuck on a new spur in the Mt. Emily Road and had to be pulled out the next morning by a bulldozer that was excavating for the new road!)P1010892

Slabtown – A “Slice” of Portland History

An important institution in an historic neighborhood

An important institution in an historic neighborhood

After six posts on pubs and taverns in Europe based on our Rick Steves’ Best of Europe Tour, Thebeerchaser takes comfort in returning home – to the roughly 700 watering holes in Portland.  And what better way to regain the origins of this blog than reviewing a Portland classic dive bar – Slabtown.

External character in a manner of speaking

External character in a manner of speaking

As evidence of its status, it is the only bar other than the recently Beerchaser reviewed Slammer Tavern (September 2013) that has been named one of the favorite bars in the ”hallowed” – at least in my eyes because of its value as a reference source – Willamette Week Drink Guide (Favorite Bars) for the last six  years.

And as we walk you through our visit to this NW Portland institution, we will provide some highlights from the WW past reviews:

2013“Old-school rock and roll venue, Slabtown is, as ever, a play-town for putative grown-ups (with occasional all-ages shows served up from the back entrance) with pinball, air hockey, Skee-ball and Pop-a-Shot.”          

Old School venue with traditional bar competition
Old School venue with traditional bar competition – Air Hockey, etc.

I was pleased to have Portland lawyer, Scott Whipple, a Beerchaser regular and esteemed graduate of Iowa’s Grinnell College (where they still talk about his accomplishments on the basketball court) accompany me both to this bar and our second stop that night at the Skyline Tavern.

Fred and Scott - A character in a bar with character(s)
Fred and Scott – A character in a bar with character(s)

We sat at the bar next to a great old guy with a white beard, overalls and a baseball cap named Fred, who while I talked to the friendly bartender, Dave, wanted to engage Scott on topics such as “quality trading” in the stock market,  World War II and the global economy.  Ben, another quality barkeeper who has worked there for 4 1/2 years was there working with Dave on my second visit.

Two Class A Bartenders - Dave and Ben

Two Class A Bartenders – Dave and Ben with Thebeerchaser Logo

Dave was very helpful, has worked there for 18 months, is a Wilson High graduate and the grandson of John Howard,  the former and very well-regarded President of Lewis and Clark College.

2011 - “….Slabtown has changed, man.  But don’t freak out – it has changed for the better.  

The owners booted the video poker machines for more pinball and video games (this place is like a Chuck E. Cheeses for adults) upgraded the sound system a bit and incorporated a wider range of music into the schedule….The building seems further from collapse than ever before….”

Old style pinball machines replaced Video Lottery --- Good Move!!

Old style pinball machines replaced Video Lottery — Good Move!!

Distinguishing Characteristics

Its History – Slabtown has been around since the ‘70’s under three different owners   It was originally a strip club and was also known as “Cal’s Fort.”   It has an interesting “altar” near the entrance, paying tribute to fabled rock musicians Wendy O’ Williams and Freddie Mercury.  The bar was also used as a set for two scenes from the “Portlandia” show.

The "alter" at the entrance.

The “altar” at the entrance.

The Slabtown neighborhood is also one of Portland’s most historic neighborhoods and oozes with history as evidenced by this excerpt from the July 13, 2013 The Oregonian

“For a century, Wallace Park was the site of trading for Native Americans, (Tracy) Prince writes in “Portland’s Slabtown.” The book (published by Arcadia Press) traces the Slabtown neighborhood’s history……when Native Americans outnumbered white settlers 1,000 to 275, through its blue-collar decades, and into its current “Trendy-third” reputation for its Northwest 23rd Avenue boutiques…..

It was a working-class neighborhood home to marginalized groups — Native Americans, Chinese and European immigrants, gypsies, and black Portlanders.”

Timber is a key to the "roots" of Slabtown.

Timber is a key to the “roots” of Slabtown.

Why the name “Slabtown?  “….back in the industrial days of lumber milling, the slabs of the rounded tree edges made good fuel and were to be found all over this area.” (KGW.com 9/7/2010).  The slices of wood piled up at the George Weidler Lumber Mill on NW Northrup Street commencing in the 1870’s.

The Menu – It’s entirely vegan since last June!  This is the first time Thebeerchaser has encountered this situation although it was not a problem.  Neither Scott nor I could tell the difference between the excellent large order of vegan french fries we had that night versus what we are used to……..

A very positive change initiated in July 2012 was the introduction of Falafel to their kitchen with a new chef.  You can see the reviews are superb:

Yelp 6/6/13:  “Dive BAR! but right now they are renting the kitchen out to an amazing FALAFEL CHEF… So good you must try…”

Although a limited menu, the food gets high marks.
Although a limited menu, the food gets high marks.

Yelp 5/9/13:  “Best falafel sandwich I’ve had in Portland and quite surprising to find it at a dive bar.”

Yelp 10/12/13:  “Lover’s of delicious food: this is a serious find. It is a serious dive……But the people who make the falafel are serious about their craft. I’ve never had a better gyro, and I’ve been to Greece and eaten them there, so I feel like I am qualified to speak to Gyro power.”

Drum sticks and guitar strings - A unique feature

Drum sticks and guitar strings – A unique feature

The Vending Machines – It may well be that Slabtown is the only bar in Portland where one can purchase both guitar strings and drumsticks (not the kind one eats) from a vending machine.

You can also see Scott waiting in anticipation at the kissing booth, which, understandably,  did not get any participants when we were there.  There are also a number of old classic pinball machines, air hockey and skee-ball and Pop-a-Shot that did see a lot of action.

"Better not give up  your day job, Scott."
“Better not give up your day job, Scott.”

2010 - “…You can order a basket of French fries and  play pinball for three hours and no one is going to try to grab your boobs…”

Pop-a-Shot - The score reflects Whipple regressing to his college days at Grinnell...

Pop-a-Shot – The score reflects Whipple regressing to his college days at Grinnell…

But perhaps the machine that ended up with more than several of our dollars in its belly, was Pop-a-Shot.

Scott immediately gravitated to the machine and we played no less than five games in which he marginally came out on top in four of them. Scott sang the Grinnell Fight Song as he shot.  After we went back into the bar, Dave the bartender, said to me, “He’s a competitive guy, isn’t he?” (If  you only knew, Dave….)

As a Concert and Performance Venue – When I asked Dave and Ben how they would best describe Slabtown i.e. Dive Bar, Neighborhood Bar, Music Venue, Ben stated, “It’s something different to each person and can be each of those.”  Dave, however, chose the Performance Venue option because of the history and the percentage of the bar’s receipts resulting from these shows.

Indeed, check out the calendar on the Slabtown Website or Facebook page – a full calendar with different types of music – live and otherwise – some with cover charge – some free – almost every night.  They also have all-ages shows to open it up for more patrons and obviously, closely control the alcohol for underage folk.  Also Bingo and Industry Night events on Tuesdays.

2008“….Slabtown strikes a near perfect balance between style and scum with dirty rock and plenty of breathing room to relax over cheap food and plentiful beer…A fine after-work drinking spot if there ever was one.”           

Scott at the "Bar" - making a closing argument to himself

Scott at the “Bar” – making a closing argument to himself

As a sign by the entrance said at one time, “This isn’t the Pearl – It’s  Slabtown!  You’ve been warned.”

So noted!  And that’s a good thing.  Check them out while you have a gyro….

Slabtown       1033 NW 16th

The Beerchaser Goes International…

Our final night in Paris

Our final night in Paris

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel, read only a page.”

Although Thebeerchaser and his wife, Janet, did not have these words by St. Augustine in mind when signing up for a Rick Steves’ “21-Day Best of Europe Tour, they had new meaning when we returned – for we had never been to Europe previously. And after the journey, we felt like we had read a Classic.  It was an intense and absolutely wonderful way to hit the highlights of that continent.

Most of the recommendations in this blog are for taverns, but there’s an exception for Rick Steves – whether it’s a guided tour, his travel consulting or Steves’ publications, check them out with the link above.  You can see from the map, we hit six countries in 21-days and our wonderful tour director, Lisa Friend, was a mentor, history teacher and yes – a  “Friend”….

Rick Steves

Route of the 21-day Best of Europe Tour (Parens indicate number of nights in each stop)

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The best bus driver in Europe - Richard - with Lisa Friend

The best bus driver in Europe – Richard – with Lisa Friend

We traveled by bus – 28 of us, on a classy sixty-seat bus.

Charles Kuralt once observed, “Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything.”

However, the bus was a superb way to travel through Europe, and the scenery – whether viewing castles through the Rhine Valley in Germany, the Mediterranean in Italy’s Cinque Terra or the Lauterbrunnen Valley in Switzerland – was breathtaking.

Since I was away from Portland, I tried to hit one bar or public house – even if just for a photo – in most of the stops along our journey.

The tour of bars, pubs and taverns continued on the trip

The tour of bars, pubs and taverns continued on the trip

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And there are some differences, which brought home, so to speak, why I love Portland bars.  Those in Europe tend to be part of a hotel or restaurant – “Cafes” – if you will, rather than just a neighborhood watering hole for beer drinkers like the approximately 550 to 750 bars in Portland – depending on your source and the definition used.

When we return to Europe, I will do some research before the trip using a good website – to better explore Europe’s best bars:

The Classic (and my favorite) Dive - The Ship Tavern in Multnomah Village

The Classic (and my favorite) Dive Bar – The Ship Tavern in Multnomah Village

http://besteuropebars.com/category/bars/

While not having a lot of time to search for them, I didn’t see a great dive bar in Europe – one that validates this apt description of these joints, to wit:  “Like saints, dive bars should always be guilty until proven innocent — they always stagger  on the precipice of becoming popular and thus ruined.”  (Willamette Week 2010 – “One Hundred Favorite Bars”)

In the next several posts, I’ll include some pictures and brief comments from the establishments below visited on our trip.  Besides the cafes and pubs, other highlights are pictures from some of the wonderful churches and cathedrals at which I marveled – most of which were not on our tour, but I sought out in the free time.  A perfect example is St. James (Jakobs) Lutheran Church in the historic German city of Rothenburg.

St. Jakobs (James) in Rothenberg

St. James (Jakobs) in Rothenburg

Oh, the history!  The church was built between 1325 to 1485 and in 1525 the peasant leader, Florian Geyer, read aloud the articles of the revolting peasants from its west chancel.

St. James Cathedral, built between 1311-1484. The church was consecrated in 1485 by the Bishop of Würzburg.

St. James Church, built between 1311-1484 – consecrated in 1485 by the Bishop of Würzburg.

   

in Rautenberg, Germany
The Holy Blood altarpiece of the Wurzburg wood-carver, Tillman Riemenschneider, carved 1500 to 1505 and located in St. James Church.

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The cafes or bars I “visited” included the following:

Amsterdam, Netherlands – Cafe Karpershoek and the Heineken Museum “Experience”      

Arnhem, Netherlands – The Bier Brewery at the Arnhem Open Air Museum

Rothenburg, Germany – Zur Holl (Hell’s) Tavern

Venice, Italy – The Devil’s Forest Pub

Vernazza, Italy (The Cinque’ Terra) – The Blue Marlin Café

Rome, Italy – Miscellanea Café

Laterbrunnen, Switzerland – Horner Pub and the bar at the summit of Schilthorn in the Bernese Alps

Beaune, France – Publican Bar

Paris, FranceThe Beer Station and La Vin Coeur Café

Our flight to Europe took us to Amsterdam and we flew home on a flight – originating in Paris with a brief Amsterdam layover.  Both of the long flights (ten and eleven hours) to and from Amsterdam were Delta non-stop and excellent flights.  We were fortunate that the young children on the jet behaved wonderfully and a long flight with kids brings to mind the story of the businessman who learned never to try to be nice by playing peek-a-boo with a child sitting in the row in front of him.

There’s no end to the game and he finally yelled at the young boy, “Look kid, it’s always going to be me - okay……..?”

The museum has on display 8,000 objects of art and history, from their total collection of 1 million The Ri  Museum in Amsterdam with objects from the years 1200–2000, among which are some masterpieces by Rembrandt, Frans Hals, and Johannes Vermeer

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam which has on display 8,000 objects of art and history, from their total collection of 1 million.  Included are objects from the years 1200–2000, among which are some masterpieces by Rembrandt, Frans Hals, and Johannes Vermeer

Amsterdam is an amazing city – from the hordes of cyclists – none of whom wear helmets and definitely command the right of way over pedestrians, to the Red Light District - we passed through on our walking tour – to the coffee houses where cannabis is a mainstay on the menu.  The city actually has more kilometers of canals than Venice.

In Haarlem, where we stayed two nights – a 35-minute train ride from Amsterdam – we ate in a café in a strucutre with a foundation laid about 1500.  During the Spanish siege in 1572, there were about 50 brewing companies in the city, while 45 years later  the city numbered about one hundred breweries.

Amsterdam Pubs, Etc. - There are a number of bars which claim to be the oldest in Amsterdam, among them Café Karpershoek, only a few blocks from the massive and historic Central Station (rail terminal) and the Red Light District.  We stopped in for a quick Heineken and enjoyed the ambiance of our first European bar.

Café Karpershoek in Amsterdam

Café Karpershoek in Amsterdam

Karpershoek,

The slogan on the beam says, "          "

The Dutch slogan on the beam says, “A day without laughter is a day wasted.”

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We concurred with the February review on Trip Advisor stating, “I visited the Café Karpershoek, which claims to be the oldest pub in Amsterdam, (starting in 1606). The staff was friendly and the beer, while more expensive than many places, was quite good.”          

The Heiniken "Experience"

The Heineken “Experience”

Speaking of Heineken, it’s the world’s third largest brewer, with 125 breweries in more than 70 countries and employs approximately 66,000.  The sign on the building stating “Heineken Brewery” is not accurate – this site, as a brewery, closed in 1988.

The Heineken Experience, however, is a large museum and tasting room that we walked by on our way back from the Rijksmuseum and the Anne Frank House.  Time precluded a visit, but the reviews on various web sites are favorable although the 16 Euro price seemed pretty steep:

This is not just a museum it really is an experience.  Set on four levels this former brewery has everything you need to know about the Heineken Brand. History, information, tasting areas, videos, games and even a roller coaster type video ride that’s very funny and informative.  At the end of the tour you get two drinks of your choice..”

One other thought on airport security while it is freshThose who complain about TSA procedures in America, should be thankful – after going through security in Paris, we had two more encounters before boarding our flight in Amsterdam even though we had not left the secure area.  The first guard who complimented me on my belt did not mitigate the statement of the next official who said, “You look a lot older than your passport photo.” – taken this January.  And I will avoid conveying the awkwardness of trying to extricate a credit card from my money-belt, after it set off the alarm.

Wendie, Roxie and Janet with Hans, the bartender from the Devils Pub
Roxie, Wendy and Janet with Hans, the bartender, at the Devils Forest Pub in Venice

I’ll be back on the next post to talk about pubs in Arnhem, Rothenburg and Venice including the Devil’s Forest Pub in Italy’s Floating City shown here with two of our great new friends from the tour.

 

Our tour group in front of the Grote Kirk (Large Church) in Haarlem’s Central Market Square – right next to our hotel

The Horse Brass Pub – Pinnacle of Perfection

The Horse Brass Pub - One of America's 100 Best Beer Bars

Thebeerchaser at The Horse Brass Pub – One of America’s 100 Best Beer Bars

Although the power and prestige of England have diminished since the days of Admiral Nelson’s exploits for the Royal Navy in the 18th century and Winston Churchill’s fiery oratory during World War II, one is reminded of the superiority of the Brits when it comes to pubs.

It is doubtful that English poet, John Milton, was referencing drinking establishments when he stated in 1643, “Let not England forget her precedence of teaching nations how to live”.  The Horse Brass Pub in Portland, however, does a wonderful job emulating the classic English public house and is worth a visit by every Portlander. “Arguably, holding the title of Portland’s best bar since in opened in 1976…It’s a tribute to all thing English.” (Willamette Week’s 2012 “Our 105 Favorite Bars, Pubs and Clubs.”)

Sign at the Entrance to the Horse Brass Pub

Sign at the Entrance to the Horse Brass Pub

Along with five other Portland bars, the Horse Brass Pub (HPB) made the honor roll of the 2012 Draft Magazine’s “One Hundred Best Beer Bars in the USA”:

“….Founder, Don Younger…claimed, ‘If it were any more authentic, you’d need a passport,’ he wasn’t kidding….Bric-a-brac adorns the nicotine-stained walls (from the old smoking days) of this dimly-lit, wood-paneled pub, perfectly recreating the neighborhood haunts of England….

HBP has championed the craft beer movement since 1976, and with its legacy still intact as perhaps the best bar in the nation, it isn’t just a destination in Portland, but a bucket-list item for any beer lover.”

Horsebrass

English Horsebrass Featuring Gloucester Cathedral

My San Francisco friend and consultant, Dave Hicks, and I hit the HBP for dinner and then traveled a short distance to another one of Draft Magazine’s 100 Best – Belmont Station (See Beerchaser Review posted on 4/17/13)

Princeton graduate, accomplished singer and beer drinker, Dave Hicks

Princeton graduate, accomplished singer and beer drinker, Dave Hicks

Hicks has traveled all over the world and commented on the authenticity of the pub except for one missing element — pervasive smoke which permeates the Anglican pub environment — or at least used to before the House of Commons passed a smoking ban in 2007.

Based on the 2009 expansion of the Oregon “Smoke-free Workplace Law bars and taverns could no longer permit smoking on or within ten feet of the premises.  We are confident that the cigarette lobby at the time, taking lessons from the NRA in opposing reasonable legislation, maintained, “Cigarettes don’t kill people.  It’s the tars, and toxins in the smoke.”  

Wikiemedia Commons Adverse_effects_of_tobacco_smoking_svg

Graphic of a typical bar worker’s internal organs prior to the 2009 Oregon Smoking Law

Nevertheless, this law had a dramatic impact on the environment within such establishments as the Horse Brass Pub as can be evidenced by these excerpts from my favorite annual Willamette Week resource on bars:

“Surgeon General’s Warning:  Smoking causes lung cancer, emphysema and shriveled testes.  (The new law) also leads to outdoor drinking, rain or shine, which can lead to frostbit, melanoma and accidental arousal from rubbing against another addict while taking refuge under a tiny awning….”  (“2009 Drink Guide”)                 

     Wikimedia Commons

“There used to be two types of customers here (HBP): smokers and chain smokers.  The 2009 smoking ban devastated regulars. (They all died said a bartender).  (“2011 Drink”)                 

“We worried that (the new law) would spell the end of …(the) venerable Brit Pub…Not because the 33-year old bar…wouldn’t retain its loyal patrons, but because we assumed its billowing, milkshake-thick clouds of cigarette smoke were load bearing structural elements of the building without which the sprawling pub would collapse.”  (“2009 Drink Guide”)

 

Coffin nail or structural element?
Coffin nail or structural element?

“What will become of Don Younger’s sprawling pub in 2009?  After the encyclopedic beer list and heart-stopping English breakfasts, this slice of Britain on Belmont is best known for air so thick with smoke, you could bottle it.”  (“2007 Drinkers’ Bible”)

Another often-cited difference in beer served in the US and the typical English tavern is the temperature of the beer.  For example, Hicks and I had wonderful chilled mugs of Portland Brewing’s Rose Hip Gold and Caldera Brewing’s Dry Hop Orange, which if served 4,928 miles to the east, would not be quite as frosty.  (Although it is a misconception that British beer is served warm, beer in the UK is usually served at cellar temperature – 50 to 57 °F. – Wikipedia).

This is not to suggest that English beer is bad as exemplified by this commentary from Voltaire on both British citizens and their beer:, “They (the British) are like their own beer; froth on top, dregs at bottom, the middle excellent.”

Rose Hip Gold --- Even Better on Tap

Rose Hip Gold — Even Better on Tap

The 50+ different beers on tap at HPB, including 28 rotating or guest taps, create dissonance for an indecisive drinker.  They reflect what was purportedly Don Younger’s motto, “It’s not about the beer.  It’s about the beer.”

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A Comment on the 2013 Willamette Week Bar Guide (Horse Brass review continued below)

A Valuable Resource for Thebeerchaser Tour
A Valuable Resource for Thebeerchaser Tour

As evidenced above, an important resource for this blog is the Annual Willamette Week Drinkers’ Bible or Bar Guide.  Indeed, Thebeerchaser’s printed copies for the last five years of this annual list of favorite Portland bars is a valuable resource.

The enormity of the challenge of a comprehensive tour of Portland bars, pubs and taverns hit home when I read the 2013 publication.  WW listed 121 favorite bars visited in the last year.  This compares with 41 establishments since Thebeerchaser blog commenced in August 2011.

Of WW’s favorites, Thebeerchaser has only frequented nine to this point as shown below:

Brooklyn Park Pub     Coalition Brewery     Beer     Prost     Laurel Thirst     Lutz Tavern

Goose Hollow Inn     Sasquatch Brewery *     Horse Brass Pub

* Visited, but not yet reviewed and posted on Thebeerchaser blog.

To quote Alfred Lord Tennyson, “So much to do, so little done, such things to be.”

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Horse Brass InteriorThe rich history of the Horse Brass Pub, established in 1976, can be found on its outstanding website and gives a more thorough chronology than can Thebeerchaser, but the decades of founder, Don Younger’s impact, are evident throughout.  His dedication to the fledgling craft beer industry in Oregon is his legacy.

Memorabilia enhances the Ambiance

Memorabilia enhances the Ambiance

It would be a stretch to label the food as “outstanding”; however, the menu is extensive and offers numerous English-type options.  My bangers and mash were good and ample and Dave Hicks had a similar reaction to his steak and shepherd’s pie.

And oh yes, before ending the review of the Horse Brass Pub, a recurring theme on this blog bears iteration.  Just as with the Ship Tavern and Jakes, the HBP was purportedly the scene of a simultaneous gathering of approximately twenty Portland police cars one summer night in the ’80’s.

Members of the Portland Rugby Club and the team from New Zealand they had defeated in their match that day, capped off the day with food, drink and “revelry” — Film at 11:00 ….!

The Horse Brass Pub                    4534 S.E. Belmont

A “Frank” Conversation About The Grand Cafe

The Grand Café has an interesting history, both as a bar and as a restaurant.   Thebeerchaser was joined in his recent visit by some lawyers from the Schwabe Williamson law firm’s Product Liability Group – a group of “Boeing 747 pilots,” if one considers former US Supreme Court Chief Justice, Warren Burger’s description of the judicial system: The courtrooms of America, all too often have Piper Cub advocates trying to handle the controls of Boeing 747 litigation.”                              

The Grand - at one time the Union Ave Social Club

The Grand – at one time the Union Ave Social Club

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The Grand is now a partnership and Portland luminary, athlete, bar-owner-entrepreneur (Peters’ Inn and The Habit), independent candidate for governor and former prison inmate, Frank Peters, is officially the “chef.”

Portland appellate lawyer, former “Town Hall” moderator and Oregon Duck, Jack Faust with Frank Peters

“The Grand owns me,” according to Peters, who agreed to show up that night and give our group what turned out to be an interesting tour of this historic venue – one with which he’s been associated for eighteen years.  According to Francesca, one of bartender/managers, “Frank still shows up at 5:00 A.M. each morning. He doesn’t bar-tend anymore and has mellowed in the last few years!”                                

Grand Entrance CloseupBased on some research help from former Oregonian history columnist, John Terry, and recollection by Peters, the original incarnation of The Grand was known as The Union Avenue Social Club (UASC). It dates back to 1926 when “The Club” was at the corner of Union Ave and SE Russell St. and was probably a speakeasy.

After Prohibition, it moved from Union Ave to the present site on Grand Avenue.  The UASC  was revived by Lee Hamblin, (he liked the name) owner of The Pantry – a well-known eatery on NE Broadway.  The next owner was John Asparro in 1966, and according to Frank, later by famous Portland restaurateur, Horst Mager, of Der Rheinlander, Tivoli Gardens, Couch Street Fish House, L’Omelette, Brasserie Montmarte, etc. fame.

The stairs leading to the Cha Cha Room

The stairs leading to the Cha Cha Room

The UASC ultimately flamed-out economically because a fine-dining establishment on the East Side wouldn’t attract patrons.  As one patron stated, “I found the ambiance opulent, the food mediocre and the prices unconscionable.  Never went back.”

This restaurant review from the Women’s Editor in the March 17,1975, of The Oregonian may give some insight :          

“Is it as expensive as people say?  Does it really offer 20 different coffee drinks…..? Yes, it is expensive.  And the special coffees that emanate from the tremendous imported brass espresso machine behind the bar (still there!!) seem endless…..”                             

At one time, monogrammed China and Crystal in this space.

At one time, monogrammed China and Crystal in this space.

 “Lee Hamblin…..after careful renovation and redecoration opened the UASC, perhaps the most frankly posh place in Portland to eat……Sophisticated cuisine, interior décor and service were the criteria……”

“The linens were snowy, the crystal and china monogrammed and fresh roses and candles adorned each table.  Such a meal cost $26 (remember that is a 1975 price!)  per person not including cocktails, wine and after-dinner drinks….Yet as the owner suggests, if money is a serious factor, it likely would be best to dine elsewhere.”

Frank and Francesca behind the bar

Frank and Francesca behind the bar

The bar’s interior reflects its rich history and Frank’s distinct personality – also chronicled in his self-published memoir, “The Frank Peters’ Catalog” written in the Oregon State Prison (where he was rumored to have had an office and a secretary).

After spending 30 months in prison – six of it in the Multnomah County Justice Center in Portland – he had to rebuild his life from scratch. He performed his community service at the Washington Park Zoo, shoveling elephant manure.  He also attended culinary school and earned his certificate from the American Culinary Federation.  His long association with the Grand Café followed.

Francesca with the "Grand" piano - literally......

Francesca with the “Grand” piano – literally……Live music on Saturday nights. (Notice the brass espresso machine on the right…)

Frank’s quirky personality and always creative intellect, may best be gleaned by some of the following anecdotes:

While in the State Prison, he formed The Götterdämmerung Society for the purpose of having the inmate members watch Richard Wagner’s Opera, “Ring of the Nibelung.”

He promoted the event in the prison newsletter with the following: “Seventeen hours of gods, dwarfs, giants, love, betrayal and redemption — a real Oregon State Penitentiary Soap Opera”.……The inmates met in Peters’ cell (D-533) several times before the opera was actually broadcast (on OPB) so they could bone up on a few of the plot twists” (From September 2, 1990 Oregonian column by Margie Boule)

Karaoke at the Grand - may include an occasional opera piece..

Karaoke for all ages every night at the Grand – may include an occasional opera piece..

Viewing the main picture wall is worth a visit in itself!

Viewing the main picture wall is worth a visit in itself!

While managing the Portland Mavericks minor league baseball team, to protest an umpire’s call during a game in Seattle, he stole first base–literally–and hid it in his hotel room. At another game, he rotated the team through the innings so every player played every position.

During his gubernatorial campaign, one of his ideas was to have F-4 Phantom jets from the Oregon National Guard buzz Japanese boats that were trawling in Oregon waters and driving down hauls for local fishermen. His campaign slogan was, “A Vote for Frank Peters is a Vote for America.”

In 1994, the Grand Café held a karaoke contest judged by the Honorable Steven Gallagher–the same judge who sentenced Peters to prison.

The Final Four plaque with Coach Paul Valenti's and Athletic Director, Slats Gill's pictures.

The Final Four plaque with Coach Paul Valenti’s and Athletic Director, Slats Gill’s pictures.

Frank was an outstanding athlete both at Oregon State and afterwards.  He and teammates, Terry Baker, Mel Counts, Jimmy Jarvis, et.al. on the 1962-3 OSU basketball team made it to the NCAA Final Four with a 22-9 record – “We sailed under the radar until Terry returned from the Liberty Bowl in January and then he led our team to March Madness.”

He also played AAU basketball at Claudia’s and then the East Bank Saloon where he played for international AAU championships.  He remembers getting a call in a bar in Key West, Florida from Claudia’s idiosyncratic coach, Walt Spitznagel, pressuring him to show up for the next game. (Bartender after answering phone: “Hey, anybody in this place play basketball in Portland, Oregon?”)

Frank - the short guy in the middle - with fellow East Bank Saloon AAU Teammates and former Blazers Leroy Ellis and Dale Schleuter
Frank – the short guy in the middle – with fellow East Bank Saloon AAU Teammates and former Blazers Leroy Ellis and Dale Schleuter

He even played briefly (“I was a ‘cup-of-coffee’ – for the Orioles – that’s how long I was up in the Majors…”) for the Baltimore Orioles and showed me a letter – he gets about two per month from collectors – with his Rookie baseball card enclosed asking for his autograph.  

Brooks Robinson replacement???!!!

Brooks Robinson replacement???!!!

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The basement of the Grand is devoted to one of its traditions – Salsa Dancing and Andrea’s Cha Cha Club Wednesday through Saturday nights.  Our group even had its own Salsa dance lesson.  “We sell Fun,” stated Peters, “And Salsa dancing is not defined by age,” - our group may have validated this premise!   Andrea, the originator of the Cha Cha Club and one of the partners in the Grand, personally leads the dancing lessons from 9 – 10 PM Wednesday through Saturday night.

"May I cha cha cha to the bench, Your Honor?

“May I cha-cha-cha to the Bench, Your Honor?  (Instruction by Gina)

A Tradition and Still Going Strong

A Tradition and Still Going Strong

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The walls leading to the intriguing Cha Cha Club in the basement are filled with additional mementos and photos of Marilyn Monroe.

Marilyn

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The Bar Downstairs

The Bar Downstairs

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The Grand has karaoke every night and salsa dancing – you can even get a lesson – see link to the website for the schedule.   There is pub food and a good selection of drinks and beer typical of most bars, but being able to drink those beers in a building which is more than 100 years old and in which the atmosphere evokes memories of old Portland, is definitely worth a visit – or two.

A Tradition at the Grand Cafe

A Tradition at the Grand Cafe

And ask Frank to give you a tour.  He ended this one with his “motivation speech” in which he asked rhetorically, “Do you want to be a victim or a hero?  You decide.”

I have a feeling that there was not much of a cerebral debate on this question by each lawyer to whom it was directed.

Francesca and Frank with Thebeerchaser logo

Francesca and Frank with Thebeerchaser logo

The Grand Café          832 Grand Avenue

Some More About Frank Peters…….

Frank Peters has always been and remains a character.  Those who listened to his recent interview on Dwight Jaynes’ (according to Frank and confirmed by The Godfather – the one-time President of the two-member Frank Peters’ Fan Club when Dwight worked for the Portland Beavers) “Posting Up” program on Comcast SportsNet NW,  can gain insight on his personal philosophy and how it was changed by his life experience.

When I asked about whether it made him angry that part of his prison sentence was for marijuana growing and distribution –  a line-of-work that might as of January, 2013, make him an entrepreneur in the states of Washington or Colorado, he stated, “I’m not mad - I broke the law at that time.”  He also talked about how proud he is of his granddaughter, who is an excellent high school volleyball player at one of the PIL Schools.                                                         

Frank's granddaughter (lower left) and the Cha Cha Group

Frank’s granddaughter (lower left) and the Cha Cha Group….!

                          

Peters’ book – about 50+ pages – an eclectic collection of quotes, observations and anecdotes in a loose-leaf binder with a picture of him campaigning for Governor in Eastern Oregon – warrants additional consideration.   Thebeerchaser offers these quotes as examples of why it was an interesting read.  (There are no page numbers so they are not cited.)

On Portland in the Golden ’70’s — and then the ’80’s

My studio (apartment) at the Sovereign was on the 2nd floor, overlooking the main drag on the corner of Broadway and Madison.  Two large eagles flanked my one large window giving the effect of a speaking balcony.  The Sovereign was a class hotel in the 1920’s, and now it is a historic building with tile bathrooms.  The walls are sound proof with high ceilings.

The Sovereign - also has mellowed with age...

The Sovereign – also has mellowed with age…

On one side lived a violinist with Maybury’s (Peters’ nickname for Portland) symphony, on the other, a premier rock & roll sound system operator.  The Sovereign (was) is home for people on their way up.  Restaurant Managers, students, young professionals, etc.  Eleven floors of unusually unique people – no kids, no dogs allowed.

My problems began the day the lights were turned out at Peters Inn and my other restaurants.  I went thru several bankruptcies and loss of identity – ‘Occupational Hazard, No Occupation at all.’ – Song by Jimmy Buffett….The ‘80’s found ‘No Game Today,’ ‘No More Mavericks,’ ‘Frank Peters Bar-less’ and ‘No inexperience required.’

On Cannabis…

Marijuana is called weed, grass, ganja, bud or hemp.  It’s a plant representing many things to many people.  It’s made of stems, roots, seeds, smell & leaves.  It is used for rope, sails, medicine and sweet dreams…..It grows as tall as a 2 story house, or as dwarfed as a basset hound…..As a green plant, it’s the base of the food chain.

"Raises some philosophical and policy questions
“Raises some philosophical and policy questions

On Time in the Multnomah County Justice Center

On the inside looking out, or is it the outside looking in?  Surrounded by people, yet so alone.  From the eighth floor, I observe people on the street taking care of business, and the construction progress of the new store “Saks Fifth Avenue.  This is the project that replaced my restaurant, Peters Inn.  Not a happy day.

On Prison Life in the Oregon State Penitentiary

Well, I served 30 months – to the day, and there isn’t a doubt in my mind that I am a better person.  I do not recommend prison; however, if it is necessary the time can be well spent elsewhere.

I was in Salem, with a new set of goals and objectives – Survival.  The title of  Willamette Week’s article was ‘Sex, Lies and Video Tape.’  It could have been worse. Salem was a good place for me to be.

I still don’t know if I have a minimum (sentence) – I don’t know what I have.  How can I complain when there are over 300 lifers, with many never getting out – very heavy.  I signed up for school.  I scored grade level 12 on my tests (English, which is a foreign language to me, held my score down) typical of an OSU graduate….

Home for twenty-four months after six in the Justice Center in Portland
The Oregon State Penitentiary – twenty-four months after six in the Justice Center in Portland

 My life, physically and socially has been on a severe downhill slide for the last six months. Can it get worse?  It seems worse, but at least I know my sentence and I feel a little better.  Then I look carefully at my neighbors; tattoos, weight lifter arms and repeat offender attitudes.  I proceed with caution, great caution and keep my mouth shut as the mood loosens with light conversation.

Then I hear from an immense Black inmate.  ‘Hey Peters, remember me, you kicked me out of your club.  You sure are white.’Well,” I say, ‘I’ve been kicked out of my own club so don’t feel bad.’

“Frank, I would like to ask you to do something for us, but I don’t know how to ask,” explained Grizz, ‘Just ask,’ said Buzz. Grizz gives Bud a dirty look and says, ‘O.K., O.K. – Frank, will you play softball for us?  We are in third place, and our goal is to make the playoffs.  We are the Marauders, sponsored by the Lifers….’  I look at Bud, Bill and Grizz, then I look at the other four hundred plus inmates and made my decision on the spot.  I played for the Marauders.  We won the second half and made the playoffs, I proceeded to go to prison on a softball scholarship. It was fun and the only way to go.

According to Maslow; we seek freedom from fear, food and shelter, love and belonging, ego and self-actualization.  This doesn’t leave a prison person many choices.  Food and shelter are the only absolutes.  Where should my plan focus?  After a few games (mental footwork) with inmates and guards, I decided to self-actualize.  In my mind, self-actualization is borderline fantasy, and everyone in prison lives fantasy.

An attempt to reach the top of the pyramid

An attempt to reach the top of the pyramid

If your mind is on the outside, you believe friends and lovers remain faithful and big paying jobs will be available.  Maybe your mother in truth is faithful – ‘even Hitler had a mother.’  If your mind is on the inside, you do sports, walk the yard, pump pig iron, chase the bag or take big deals.

Self-actualization is self-development, NOT people or system development.  I decided to make prison an adventure.  A plan of self-actualization and a plan to live fantasy.  A practical reality plan to live in Fantasyland.  Oregon State Penitentiary.

PRESS RELEASE – FRANK PETERS  #53381- cont. 08/14/90

…Behind the scenes, Peters dispenses a new brand of counseling to younger inmates.  He challenges rather than gives gratuitous advice, challenges them to find their own path to a better life after prison. Challenges them to seek their own answers, and put their experience to proper use on the ‘outside.’ Whether this approach will save one from a repeat prison term or not, no one will likely ever know.  But it is unique and innovative method that seems at least to spark some favorable response…..

Philosophically Peters declares he’s learned one thing, ‘The person wasn’t bad, their thinking was bad.’ Peters declines to reveal just how he plans this (1,000 hours of community service) but indicates that ‘the real value is to make an overall contribution to the quality of life, something worthy of his energies.  If the journey doesn’t change you, why bother to leave home?’

On the Campaign for Governor

‘Never be neutral in a conflict, whoever wins must destroy the uncommitted’ (Machiavelli, year 1539).  This leaves little room for an independent in power politics.  The game plan was to run a ‘state-wide’ campaign with credibility and open the door for other non-party candidates.  We hoped to split Democratic & Republican votes at all levels and make deals….It destroys the ‘good old boy politics’ and political party ladder.  It opens the door for real democracy.

Machiavelli - some day my Prince will come
Machiavelli – some day my Prince will come

Any concerned person can participate.  Events did not work in our favor.  Four years we campaigned…..in small towns throughout Oregon…..‘A vote for Frank Peters is a vote for America.’ They never knew how close we came to killing their political Dinosaur….The possibilities were awesome….We were serious – Machiavelli serious.

The White Eagle Saloon and the November Beerchaser of the Month – Forrest Green

Thebeerchaser and spouse, Janet, at the entrance to the Historic White Eagle Saloon

There are now approximately sixty-five McMenamin establishments in the Northwest – an amazing growth story that began in 1983 with the Hillsdale Brewery and Public House by Mike and Brian McMenamin.  Their venues are primarily hotels and/or restaurants, brew pubs, breweries or combinations thereof, and somewhat outside Thebeerchaser pub tour guidelines.

The Greens, Janet  Williams and Fays at Jam-o-Rama

There are some exceptions, however, which would include the Fulton Pub and the White Eagle Saloon.

The White Eagle originally opened in 1905 and is now on the National Historic Register.  Because of its remarkable  history and musical tradition, our party visited in mid-September, which was also the weekend of the Jam-o-Rama 2012.

Historic on the Exterior and the Interior

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The 2012 event featured multiple bands of the Pacific Northwest from the ‘60’s through 80’s.

One of the Bands at Jam-o-Rama

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Amazingly, there is no cover charge for the day-long celebration.  Seven different bands played that day and we focused on the “Rising Sons”  featuring Dan Taylor on vocals, Forrest Green on keyboards, Tim Ellis on guitar, Jim Walker on bass, and Dan Rice on drums.

Forrest is the brother of Portland lawyer, Pat Green, and the two Green brothers and Thebeerchaser all attended Oregon City High School in the late ‘60’s.  As long as we are reviewing history, their Dad – Bill – was the Oregon City Postmaster for many years before retiring.

From L to R – Forrest, Bill and Pat Green

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The White Eagle was “born” in 1905 and the historic “Rock’n Roll” Hotel has eleven rooms.  Nightly entertainment is featured in the bar which has a stage.

The bar is a very long classic oak structure although seating in booths is somewhat limited.

A Classic Oak Bar Adds to the
Historic Ambiance

Fortunately, it is supplemented during good weather by the large adjacent beer garden.

A Spacious Beer Garden – Filled During Jam-o-Rama

Haunted — Or just Historic??

The rich history is detailed in their website.  Look at this excerpt:

“Did you know the White Eagle is called “one of the most haunted places” in Portland? ……. Set in North Portland’s industrial neighborhood, underneath the mighty span of the Fremont Bridge, the legendary White Eagle Cafe and Rock ‘n’ Roll Hotel echoes with tall tales of resident spirits, poker games and Shanghai tunnels……”

“Exposed brick walls and black-and-white photos of the old days lend a Wild West flair not just the bar, but all of Portland.”  (2007 Willamette Week Drinkers’ Bible) – see photo below:

Historic Photos Take You Back….

The website also relates tales such as a prostitute being murdered on the second floor, ghost-like apparitions, conflicts among the Polish immigrant industrial workers in the area and the rich jazz legends from which the currently nightly jams evolved:

“The Holy Modal Rounders and blues man Robert Cray helped launch the bar’s live music tradition. Others like the Isley Brothers, ZZ Top and Big Walter Horton were followed in the ’80s by Northwest music icons Paul deLay, Curtis Salgado, Norman Sylvester, Steve Bradley and more.”

The Food and Drink

As stated in the 2008 Willamette Week Drink Guide, “White Eagle’s menu and beer selection are standard McMenamin’s fare, but the historic hotel/bordello creaky floors, lofty ceilings and rumored ghosts lend a spooky charm.”

While the food was essentially as stated above, we were surprised at how quickly we got served (not usually the case at McMenamins) even with the Jam-o-Rama crowd.  The Reuben sandwich and the Irish Stew were both very good and the McM’ns beer is pretty good whatever you choose.

Forrest Green – November Beerchaser-of-the-Month

Other than having a name which oozes sustainability, until the late ‘60’s Forrest Green was a typical high school student – a class officer in his junior year at Oregon City High School and a talented musician who started his own garage band and a group called The Rising Sons. In 1967, Forrest’s senior year at OCHS, he got a call from Don Grady (who also starred as Robbie in the hit sitcom “My Three Sons.”  )       

The Rising Sons in 1967 – Forrest is on the left

——————-Grady had become aware of Green’s talent on the keyboard and asked him if he wanted to tour with his group, Yellow Balloon.  Forrest became the envy of his classmates and played with Yellow Balloon which released a song with a title identical to the group moniker.  Although “Yellow Ballon” was their only hit, it climbed to # 25 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967.  The group disbanded after their tour and release of one album.  (Unfortunately, Grady passed away this year.)

The Yellow Balloons on Tour  – Green on the left and Grady is second from the left

Forrest eventually went back to school receiving his under-graduate degree and also became certified in Advanced Holistic Energy Healing.  He then earned his Masters Degree in Humanistic Clinical Psychology and is a master improvisational musician.

His musical gifts and his keen interest in the environment, combined with his love of travel have taken him to Peru, Bolivia, Southwest England, Wales, France, the island of Bimini, the dolphin bays of Hawaii, the Southwest, Northwest and Northeast United States and Canada.

He formed his own consulting firm, Soul Source while in Northern California. After living in Vermont, he then moved to Asheville, North Carolina, where he now resides. His firm is “an avenue for healing energetics offering individual sessions, group facilitation and presentations to enhance the personal and spiritual well-being of children and adults.  It also provides environmental, energy space clearing of homes, offices and land.”  The link to his website is below and is definitely worth checking out:

Soul Source

It was a nice reunion with Forrest, especially since it was a the White Eagle and we had an opportunity to hear his first group.  His musical skills continue to be outstanding and he has done an admirable job pursuing his passion in a very successful career.

And check out the White Eagle.  If you are secure and not easily frightened, it’s even worth spending a night in the hotel after dinner and live music – perhaps during Jam-o-Rama 2013!

The White Eagle Saloon                         836 N. Russell